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December 3, 2012

ABA Center on Children and the Law Dedicates New Library Collection at University of the District of Columbia

(from left): Karen Forman, associate dean for public interest, clinical and graduate programs; Laurie Morin, associate dean for academic affairs; Shelley Broderick, dean of the David A. Clarke School of Law; Trowbridge; Davidson; Helen Frazer, interim director of the Mason Law Library; Han Ouyang, assistant director and head of technical services at the law library; Gail Mathapo, circulation librarian; and Kipling Ross, associate dean of administration and finance.

(from left): Karen Forman, associate dean for public interest, clinical and graduate programs; Laurie Morin, associate dean for academic affairs; Shelley Broderick, dean of the David A. Clarke School of Law; Trowbridge; Davidson; Helen Frazer, interim director of the Mason Law Library; Han Ouyang, assistant director and head of technical services at the law library; Gail Mathapo, circulation librarian; and Kipling Ross, associate dean of administration and finance.

The _ Center on Children and the Law on Monday dedicated its “ABA Children and the Law Collection” at the library of the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law.

Staff attorney Scott Trowbridge used his connections as a UDC alumnus to help make the move from the ABA center’s basement library to the law school happen.

The library “can be used not only by center staff but also by child welfare lawyers throughout the metropolitan D.C. area,” said Howard Davidson, director of the ABA Center on Children and the Law. “It is being carefully catalogued and supplemented, hopefully making it the best historical child/youth/family law library in the country.”

As an entity of the ABA Young Lawyers Division, the Center on Children and the Law has for more than 32 years been a leader in providing technical assistance, training and research programming that addresses the broad spectrum of law and court-related topics associated with children.  The center works to help professionals meet the needs of vulnerable children involved in the court system through a variety of avenues and is funded by grants and contracts through governmental and private sources.